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Pattern illustrations

wallpapers, textile design, tapestry the application is endless.
Picture of an exhibition room starring a wallpaper illustrated by Swindler & Swindler

Picture of an exhibition room starring a wallpaper illustrated by Swindler & Swindler

Fauna and flora drawing for a wall pattern

Fauna and flora drawing for a wall pattern

Black and white illustration for a pattern

Black and white illustration for a pattern

Botanical drawing for a wall paper

Botanical drawing for a wall paper

Repetitive sketch of fauna and flora for a wall

Repetitive sketch of fauna and flora for a wall

Black and white botanical sketch of for a pattern

Black and white botanical sketch of for a pattern

A light motif of flowers

A light motif of flowers

A dense pattern of flower

A dense pattern of flower

A slightly dense pattern of flower

A slightly dense pattern of flower

Final pattern ant it's variations for the Spanish Gallery. Version 3

Final pattern ant it's variations for the Spanish Gallery. Version 3

First version of the final pattern for the Spanish Gallery.

First version of the final pattern for the Spanish Gallery.

Version 2 of the final pattern for the Spanish Gallery.

Version 2 of the final pattern for the Spanish Gallery.

Illustration applied to wallpaper and textiles offers many possibilities.

For a personalization of the space

The use of art on wallpaper can be used to delineate space and add a personal touch to an interior space. In contrast to a white or neutral space, wallpaper can be a way to create visual distinction. It can also be used to clearly and immediately indicate the transition from a personal space to a public space, without the need for signs or written directions.

For a visual journey

Wallpaper can also be used to travel through time and into other worlds. The immediate reference that comes to mind when thinking about wallpaper is the Art & Crafts movement theorized by William Morris. Floral interlacing, fauna and flora forever immortalized, the pattern was king of the imagination. It encouraged reverie by creating a visual support for the imagination. His daughter, May Morris, who worked her all life in her father's studio, was also an accomplished and multidisciplinary artist. She created many mythical designs and embroideries.